Wednesday, October 20, 2010

Woman In Yellow And Black; Woman In Pink And Blue

 Drawn this morning, from life.

Pastel and charcoal on 12"x16" black pastel paper.

26 comments:

  1. The lady in pink and blue is in the half-dream state, when the bed starts to dissolve into a lake or a forest.

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  2. AH, that's what I was drawing--water below and branching stuff (water over rocks?) flowing down above. Cool that you see the dream state.

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  3. I think I'll be back for more. Very interesting drawings!

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  4. Kate, I'm glad. Check the walking stick post; I've just added a few of the names and stories.

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  5. I didn't see so much dream state, although now I do, but I definitely go the water vibe. I really saw her as part of the water, but separate as well.

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  6. I LOVE the first piece- Woman in Yellow and Black. Kinda dark, beautiful, poignant. Love it.

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  7. Thank you, TravellingMeg. It's a favorite of mine.

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  8. Pink and Blue, tho' I think I was seeing air (and levitation??!! or something like that) more than water.
    But "dreamy" works for all the above.

    How's this for a non-artist question: what do you DO with all these? I think it was Margaret who commented recently on how prolific you are. Indeed!

    I also like the guy's head yesterday.

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  9. beautiful freeness in your hand

    yes, you are prolific

    I think we'll have these wonderful works with us beyond lifetimes

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  10. I like the colors in both. The first one has such intensity and the look on her face, I want to know what she's thinking. I especially like the diagonal lines creating motion and tension. The second one is the opposite in mood but again, to me, the horizontal and vertical lines set the tone. You have an Etsy shop?

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  11. Banjo, thank you. Air and levitation works, too. I was feeling water, rocks, branches, but I obviously wasn't being literal in transcription.

    Right now, I just hang on to the pieces. Sometimes I draw or paint over the ones I don't want to keep.

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  12. PI, or MG if I may, thank you. Not too worried about the ages, but I do use archival materials, so . . . .

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  13. Laura, back atcha (a Texan expression I've just learned that applies well here). (It means, I love your work, too.)

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  14. Paula, hi and thanks. No etsy shop. I haven't been offering these for sale at all.

    I did sell one drawing to a woman who really wanted it. She contacted me through email to inquire.

    She wanted more, but at the time (while I wasn't painting or drawing), I wasn't able to sell her more.

    Now I'm feeling better and am drawing again, so I am willing to sell my work. I just haven't exactly worked out how, yet. I am of course willing to answer email requests.

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  17. you said:
    Drawn this morning, from life

    and I would say that...
    this drawing is alive,
    the model exudes life!

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  18. does water always have to be blue? The first drawing has a mossy appearance. Do I hear Jules Verne?

    that little splash of color on the upper right hand corner...nice

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  19. PA, thanks. I like the Jules Verne allusion. One of my favorite storytellers (I have a partiality for sci-fi). You're giving me lots of ideas.

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  20. After you commented on my blog, i came to check out yours, and I am truly impressed! You have amazing paintings! I also like to paint in my (almost virtual) free time, but nothing compared to this (also stylistically different).

    Best wishes :)

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  21. Thank you, Rute. I love the recipes you are posting and also the photos you are pairing them with. I'm not surprised to hear that you also paint.

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  22. The expresion of the Woman In Yellow and Black is especially striking. Not one to suffer fools gladly, I'm guessing.

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  23. K, I see that. The posture of the figure in that drawing contributes to that message, too.

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