Friday, June 8, 2012

Grey Abandon; Red Abandon


Drawn from life, Wednesday morning.

Grey Abandon is Tombow marker on 8" x 8" watercolor paper.

Red Abandon is Tombow marker and pan pastel on watercolor paper, 9" x12".

NATURE WATCH:

First fawn of the season--almost captured in a photo. ( It's there, just blurry.)


22 comments:

  1. This pose it's great, find it full of meaning and so closet to me...

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thanks. Laura.

    The model chose the pose, and it is extraordinarily dramatic. But it turned out, several minutes into it, that that pose was not sustainable for a long period.

    Not a problem for me, but not optimal for other artists who were doing more deliberate work.

    ReplyDelete
  3. You didn't take the easiest easel in the classroom; you got the most challenging view and did a fabulous job of foreshortening. I prefer the upper piece to the lower. Not enough value differences in the red or highlights on the figure--Listen to me will ya. Full of advice for you, none for me. But then I'm standing way back from your figure and way too close to mine.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Thanks, Linda.

    Not a classroom, just a meet-up sketching group. Highly recommend this kind of arrangement because it is much cheaper to get LOTS of figure practice.

    ReplyDelete
  5. About the lack of contrast. I'm seeing this as a landscape. The Figure is one large mass; the lights above and below are the contrasts.

    ReplyDelete
  6. very beautiful!!! I like it

    ReplyDelete
  7. top one - the way you've shown us the structure of the figure in a kind of geometric way is reminiscent of Cezanne

    ReplyDelete
  8. OH this is full of emotion and meaning - the pose as well as the colors on both. They both tell a different yet similar story. Well done!

    ReplyDelete
  9. "Landscape"--I like that idea and your execution of it. Glad you were able to "finish" on a difficult and shortened pose. I'm surprised (again) to find myself preferring the subtler color of the top one.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Liz, the funny thing is that I never much cared for Cezanne until I started hearing comparisons to him, then I re-assessed and started appreciating.

    Thanks, minnemie, I feel the emotions of these two, too.

    Thanks, Banjo. It wasn't difficult (all that drawing from life I've been doing) and had time to spare. Experience and practice really do make a huge difference.

    Thanks, Elaine. The model actually had "fairy-tale" hair, close to what is depicted.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Hah! I've been comparing you to Cezanne for years now. Not that your work is derivative -- not at all.

    There's great drama to both of these, but I think the top draws me in most, because it says so much in a few lines.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Yep, Hiker and thanks. You were the first to say that to me on-line.

    I posted these in the reverse order of drawing.

    The grey drawing benefits from the experience of the red drawing, so it could be simpler, faster, more true to the forms I wanted to emphasize.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Awesome life drawings Jean. Very expressive and vibrant.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Thes evoke a different mood from the ones we've been seeing later. A little more I wiu,don't say sinister, but maybe mysterious.

    ReplyDelete
  15. In photography we can choose between monochrome or an any number of color choices and, like here, it makes an astonishing difference how the subject matter is perceived. The first one is at rest but he second one could be straight out of CSI. I expect Catherine Willows and Sarah Sidle will show up momentarily...

    ReplyDelete
  16. Thanks, Nora. Like the adjectives!

    Thanks, Margaret. These do have very different impacts.

    Thanks, Paula. Bloody good.

    ReplyDelete
  17. Abandon is the perfect word for this pose. I love the red one, in particular.

    ReplyDelete
  18. Fabulous abandon, seems so effortless !

    ReplyDelete